A Chat With: Mauno

Hailing from Novia Scotia, Mauno combines relaxed tones and soothing, harmonious vocals with melodies that’ll keep you on your toes on their latest album Tuning. The sophomore record, which follows up 2016’s Rough Master, threads 14 tracks together in one succinct package; each track existing in its own pocket, but working best when listened through in order. Following Tuning‘s October release date, Mauno are gearing up to hit the road this Spring, stopping by Chicago to play Schubas en route to SXSW. In advance of tonight’s show, we chatted with Nick Everett of the band to talk tour, SXSW, the process behind their record and more. Tune in below to our chat with Mauno!

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Photo By Levi Manchak

Starting off, how did you all meet and decide to form Mauno?

Eliza and I met in the spring of 2014 and quickly started play music together, she on cello and me on guitar. We both nerded out about our love of The Books, but then the music we started playing asked to be taken in anther direction entirely, no matter what we wanted it to be. We expanded the sound when we brought in a drummer, Eliza moved to bass, and then we did a much needed lineup change to be where we’re at now with Adam and Scott on guitar and drums. They’re good guys who’ve been playing together for almost decades with an s.

Can you talk a little bit about the process behind your album Tuning? What was the writing and recording process like for the band?

We just try to make the noises. We try not to think about what it sounds like, so much as what the sounds are and what they need to be, to be more themselves. We don’t come at it from a musicological perspective, so the usual references don’t jive. The balance is a lot more pop-oriented than Rough Master, much more carefully crafted (we recorded the whole thing twice), and a lot more cohesive. Rough Master was about conflict and the clash of opposing ideas, and this one is much more about talking through the problems that arise in any creative project and then working together to make a whole. I think it sounds a lot more mature, but then I’ve listened to it about 10 thousand fucking times so I don’t know anything about it anymore.

Who and what are some musical and non-musical influences that inspire your writing? What about influences on your stage presence?

Definitely the work of R. Murray Schafer changed my life (Nick) and relationship to sound over the past couple of years. I read Soundscapes and moving through the world has never quite been the same since. The title is a reference to the subtitle of that book (The Tuning of the World). The background of the record is full of soundscapes, pieces from around Halifax, from around the house we recorded in there, and a couple Eliza recorded in Heidelberg and Berlin while she was living there last summer. They are little pieces of the places we lived in that have had an enormous effect on our sonic understanding and our sonic relationship to our environments. The collage of soundscapes on the record encapsulates this theme, as well as displacement– ideas of associating home with aural landscapes and the cyclical return to them. There’s a whole second soundscape record buried in there somewhere.

Other than that, the world of Christopher Small, especially Musicking has been really influential in the way we’ve talked about playing together and our relationship with the other people in the room while we’re playing. To not think of music as a thing in itself, as not actually existing, but rather a series of dance steps– an action performed in a room-has been really liberating.

As for stage presence, we just try to listen and look like a group of people listening.

What do you hope that an audience takes away from your live show?

Our album?

Which cities on your upcoming tour are you looking forward to playing in and visiting the most?

I have no idea! We’ve never traveled or played in the states, so we have no expectations. Excited to be in Chicago! We’ve driven by it a few times on our way to western Canada. American cities hold a huge place in our imaginations for sure.

What are three things you have to have with you on tour?

Instant coffee, free wifi, extra strings.

You guys will also be down at SXSW next month…what are some of your best music festival survival tips?

Oh my god, skip whatever you think you need to go to and go to bed instead. Take care of yourself — you’ve only got one.

Are there any other bands you’re hoping to catch a show from while you’re down at SXSW?

Yes definitely! Look Vibrant and Girl Ray and Fenster are good pals who rule.

What else is on the horizon for Mauno in 2018?

Making a new record and more horizons.



Mauno will be at Schubas on tonight, March 6th and the show is FREE. Check out details here


This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine

ANCHR Magazine Anniversary Showcase: Lucille Furs, The Evening Attraction & Capital Soirée

 

ANCHR Magazine turns one this January! To celebrate, they’re ringing in 2018 with a showcase at Schubas Tavern on January 5th (it’s a Friday!), featuring Lucille FursThe Evening Attraction, and Capital Soirée.  Matt Williams of  Post Animal and Cadien Lake James from Twin Peaks will also be DJing. For more about each band, keep reading, but grab your tickets to the show here.

LUCILLE FURS 

Retro rock and roll that puts a refreshing spin on the sounds we all love from the 60’s and 70’s.

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For Fans Of: The Stones, The Beatles, Cage the Elephant, Levitation Room

Go To Tracks: “Alabaster Crayon“, “Baby Blaise,” “In Samsara

Fun Fact: Lead singer Trevor Pritchett starred in Post Animal’s video for “Special Moment.” Find out more about the band here.

THE EVENING ATTRACTION

Punchy, bright guitar melodies blend with sing along choruses and a hint of twang for irresistibly catchy earworms

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For Fans Of: Blackfoot Gypsies, Sundara Karma, The Nude Party, Allah-Las

Go To Tracks: “Love So Fine,” “The Kids Don’t Care (For Rock and Roll),” “Bad Things

Fun Fact: Paul Ansani and Miles Malin of the group have been playing together since middle school, and they were in a band called The Break in high school. Find out more about the band here.

 

CAPITAL SOIRÉE

Good ol’ pop rock tunes with sticky choruses and riffs that’ll get you grooving

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For Fans Of: COIN, The Walters, Blossoms, Hippo Campus

Go To Tracks: “Second Home,” “Old School,” “Take Me Anywhere

Fun Fact: The band played a Halloween show as COPital Soirée this year, and all dressed as cops…and one of them had an unfortunate run in with law enforcement in Tennessee once. Find out more about that here.

Get ready for the show by picking up our Chicago Compilation, featuring both Lucille Furs and The Evening Attraction. Get it in store, or online here. You can also pick up Lucille Furs’ debut album in store or online now!

 

This past Friday night at Schubas Tavern, Marika Hackman and The Big Moon created an IRL experience of Hackman’s latest album I’m Not Your Man. Released on June 2nd, the sophomore album from Hackman marks a departure and transformation for the formerly folk artist. Boosting blunt lyrics, lighter melodies, and a lax, carefree recording style, I’m Not Your Man takes listeners through a 15-song journey, featuring The Big Moon as the backing band for the majority of them. Before The Big Moon pulled their second shift of the evening, backing Hackman at the Lakeview venue, they had performed their own 45 minute set, which carried the same carefree mood of friendship that comes across on their recordings. In addition to songs from their debut album Love in the 4th Dimension, the group also performed a cover of “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” Between songs, the band kept the crowd laughing with a bit of sarcasm and banter, but the standout moment of their set occurred during their song “Bonfire.” Front woman Juliette (Jules) Jackson left the stage and abandoned her guitar to sing the song with the crowd.

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Jules from The Big Moon ventures out into the crowd

The same banter and laughter only amplified when Hackman joined The Big Moon, but the focus of the night remained on the effortless musicianship displayed between the friends. The songs from I’m Not Your Man translated beautifully in the live sense, seeing as most of the album had actually been tracked live, with a minimal use of overdubs. Hackman’s hourlong set focused on the new album, with a couple of older tunes like “Cinnamon” and “Ophelia” sprinkled in. The direct, honest lyrics of tracks like “My Lover Cindy” and “Violet” had the crowd captivated and wrapped around Hackman’s finger. Prior to performing the latter, Hackman introduced “Violet” as a sexy song, encouraging the crowd to kiss their dates (only with consent) if they were feeling it. “Gina’s World” also stood out during the 11-song set, with its hauntingly heavy guitar riffs and striking harmonies, which echoed beautifully throughout the venue. Just before the set wrapped up with the dreamy “BlahBlahBlah,” Hackman and The Big Moon performed the lead single from I’m Not Your Man, Boyfriend.” The playful tune teased the light-hearted reinvention of Hackman before the release of the album, and it definitely acted as a highlight of the live show.

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Marika Hackman singing her direct and honest lyrics

More photos from the show 

Want more Marika? You can grab the physical album of I’m Not Your Man at the shop, or order it from the Shuga webstore here.


This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine.