Friday New Vinyl Releases 5/4

NEW


  • 47SOUL – Balfron Promise
  • The Aquabats – The Fury Of The Aquabats (1997) (2 Lp Reissue on Neon Green Vinyl)
  • Aquilo – II
  • Black Moth Super Rainbow – Panic Blooms (2 Lp Limited Pressing on Gold Vinyl)
  • Daniel Blumberg – Minus
  • Leon Bridges – Good Thing
  • Christian Death – Atrocities (1986) (Reissue on Opaque White Vinyl, Limited to 600)
  • Corrosion of Conformity – No Cross No Crown (2 Lp Pressing on Clear with Purple and Orange Splatter Vinyl, Limited to 1000)
  • Cut Worms – Hollow Ground (Indie Exclusive on Red Vinyl)
  • The Dynospectrum – The Dynospectrum (25th Anniversary Pressing on Cream and Black Colored Vinyl)
  • Brian Eno – Music For Installations (9 Lp Box Set of Previously Unreleased Music, 64-Page Booklet with Photographs)
  • Yonatan Gat – Universalists (Limited Pressing on Cream Colored Vinyl)
  • The Glitch Mob – See Without Eyes (Indie Exclusive on Black and Clear Blue Vinyl)
  • Holly Golightly and The Brokeoffs – Clippety Clop
  • Iceage – Beyondless
  • Jimmy Eat World – Love Never / Half Heart (Indie Exclusive 7″)
  • Damien Jurado – The Horizon Just Laughed
  • Matt and Kim – Almost Everyday (Red Vinyl)
  • Fred Mcdowell – Mississippi Delta Blues (1965) (Indie Exclusive on Transparent Yellow Vinyl)
  • Nas – I… Am (Reissue)
  • Parkway Drive – Reverence
  • Lake Street Dive – Free Yourself Up
  • Liz Phair – Exile In Guyville (1993) (25th Anniversary Reissue)
  • Malphino – Visit Malphino
  • Pink – I’m Not Dead (1st Vinyl Pressing on Pink Vinyl)
  • Pink – The Truth About Love (2 Lp Limited Reissue on Mint Green Vinyl)
  • Pink – Funhouse (1st Vinyl Pressing 2 Lp on Yellow Vinyl)
  • Reef – Revelation
  • Rise Against – The Unravelling
  • Shakey Graves – Can’t Wake Up (2 Lp Pressing)
  • Slow Corpse – Fables (with Hand-Numbered Polaroid)
  • Sum-41 – Does This Look Infected? (15th Anniversary Reissue on Clear with Green Blob Colored Vinyl, Limited to 1500)
  • Simon And Garfunkel – Greatest Hits (Reissue)
  • Thy Catafalque – Geometria (Limited to 400)
  • Trampled By Turtles – Life Is Good On The Open Road (Indie Exclusive on Yellow Vinyl)
  • Ihsahn (Emperor) – Àmr
  • Inquisition – Obscure Verses for The Multiverse (2 Lp on Green and Black Vinyl, Limited to 500)
  • Jimmy Cliff / Various – The Harder They Come (1972) (Soundtrack)
  • Billy Joel – River of Dreams (25th Anniversary Reissue on Translucent Blue Vinyl)
  • Sugar Candy Mountain – Do Right (Limited Pressing on Translucent Purple Vinyl)
  • Frank Turner – Be More Kind
  • Various Artists – Linval Presents Dub Landing Vol. 1 (2 Lp Reissue with bonus disc of original vocal cuts)
  • Various Artists – Linval Presents Dub Landing Vol. 2 (2 Lp Reissue with bonus disc of original vocal cuts)
  • Vive La Void – Vive La Void (Limited Pressing on ‘Death Money’ Vinyl)

Live Recap: Post Animal Plays a Rowdy Record Release Show to a Packed Lincoln Hall

At almost every concert you go to, there’s a sort of unspoken bond amongst audience members; a mutual love of music and an interest in the particular band performing that can take strangers, put them into a cramped room, and turn them into friends by the end of the night. At Post Animal’s album release show on Friday night, the room buzzed with an electrifying sense of camaraderie from the second the doors to Lincoln Hall opened. For many in the audience, they had already formed friendships with one another, due to the supportive nature of the Chicago music scene, and the show that would follow would only bring that community even closer.

Like most Chicago bands that have begun to garner attention nationally, and even internationally, during the last couple of years, Post Animal got their start playing DIY shows in basements and gritty locations around the city before eventually working their way up to headlining slots at the likes of The Hideout, The Empty Bottle, and The Subterranean. Headlining a sold out show at Lincoln Hall sits towards the top of many bands’ bucket lists in the city, so when Post Animal made their way up to checking this feat off their list, they made sure to put together a special show for the 500 lucky audience members that scored tickets to the gig.

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First, they had some of the freshest local (and soon-to-be local) talent warm up the stage for them, with Rookie kicking off the night. Although they’re a new project and just released a debut single last week, Chicago music scene veterans Joe Bordenaro and Max Loebman act as the group’s leaders, working together on new music and revamping music from their past projects. Their experience of playing music for years in other projects gives them a commanding stage presence and sense of chemistry as bandmates that you rarely see in a new band. By the time Rookie’s set had finished, most of the room had already filled in, and anyone who had started the night unaware of Rookie had quickly been converted to a new fan after witnessing their live show.

Next up, Slow Pulp mesmerized the packed house with their dreamy mix of psychedelic, pop, and punk tones for the next 45 minutes. Hailing from Madison, Slow Pulp will soon be making a permanent move down to Chicago, and the audience response on Friday confirmed that they will be welcomed with open arms once they make the move later this year. The crowd gave the band their undivided attention as they played through songs from their self-produced and released EP2, which is actually the band’s first release since the addition of lead singer Emily Massey. The audience sang along with Massey throughout the show, especially during “Preoccupied,” which has stacked up close to 200,000 streams on Spotify.

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Eventually the time came for Post Animal to hit the stage, and the current of energy that had been surging through the venue was further intensified when the opening riffs of “Gelatin Mode” rang out into the room. Although they’ve been playing the song live for months, the band had only recently released the track as a single with an accompanying, must-watch music video, and it acted as the perfect kickstart to the rowdy evening that would follow. Of course, no Post Animal show would be complete without a little (or a lot of) crowd surfing and moshing, and “Gelatin Mode” set the tone for a wild night when the crowd immediately started thrashing around to the fast-paced song.

Another new single from When I Think Of You In A Castle, “Tire Eyes,” followed, only slightly slowing down the pace. The exuberance of the crowd remained intact however, never wavering as the setlist weaved between songs featuring in-your-face guitar solos, like “Special Moment” and “Victory Lap: Danger Zone,” and more mellow, winding psychedelic-tinged tracks like “Castle.” The band did a great job of strategically plotting the placement of each song in the setlist, allowing for the audience fully appreciate the diverse texture and sonic diversity of not only their newest material, but some old favorites from their first two EPs. To assist with the flow of the set, the band even worked out more elaborate and refreshed transitions between songs, adding another layer to the new songs that fans can’t experience from just listening to the record.

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After playing through the majority of When I Think Of You In A Castle and staples like “Alabaster” and “You Were Not There” from their earlier catalog, Post Animal closed the first part of their set with their viral track “When I Get Home,” which has always proved to be a crowd favorite with its grooving bass line and sweeping melody. At this point in the night, the room was overflowing with positive vibes, and the crowd had already been potentially the rowdiest that the Lincoln Park concert hall has ever hosted, but things only got crazier during the encore.

Cadien Lake James from Twin Peaks first took the stage with a bottle of champagne in hand to get the audience hyped for Post Animal’s return, further demonstrating the supportive nature of the city’s music scene. After the warm introduction, the band eased the audience into the final part of their set by kicking things off with “Goggles” from their 2015 EP Post Animal Perform The Most Curious Water Activities, but when they transitioned into “Dirtpicker,” it was no holds barred for the remainder of the show. The song anchors out their new album, but it has been the hype song of their live show for a while now, always riling up the crowd with its infectiously catchy riffs. The amiable spirits of the crowd peaked during this last song as everyone exerted their final ounces of energy, working to lift each other up to crowd surf or have one last go at moshing.

By the time Post Animal walked offstage on Friday night, it was clear to everyone in the crowd that they had just witnessed a very special moment (pun intended) and while this show marked a landmark achievement for the band, it’s truly only the beginning for them. You can catch Post Animal on a headlining national tour throughout the summer, with select shows featuring Slow Pulp or fellow Chicagoans Paul Cherry and Town Criers. The summer tour includes appearances at legendary festivals like Shaky Knees, Bonnaroo, and Lollapalooza (Chicago, catch them at Lolla on Friday, August 3rd). See the rest of their tour dates here, and snag a copy of When I Think Of You In A Castle  here.

More photos of Rookie, Slow Pulp, and Post Animal at Lincoln Hall on April 27th, 2018

 

This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine

Get To Know: Slow Pulp

The four members of Madison-based outfit Slow Pulp craft memorable songs with their ability to seamlessly blend dreamy vocals with psychedelic tones, pop melodies, and a dash of cheeky, punk attitude. Since the band self-released EP2 last March, the songs on the EP have made their way onto curated Spotify playlists and collectively racked up over 200,000 plays, standing out among the masses of young, indie bands. And rightfully so; there’s something about Slow Pulp that instantly clicks with listeners and fans of live music alike. Their live show captivatingly translates their recorded music to the stage, giving them a magnetic presence.

This past weekend, Slow Pulp warmed up the stage for their friends Post Animal and will join them again on select dates in the summer.  It’s only a matter of time before they’re playing even bigger shows to new audiences across the country, so before they blow up, get to know Slow Pulp first with these five facts we learned while chatting to them at Daytrotter last month!

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SCHOOL OF ROCK IS THE REASON THEY’RE PLAYING MUSIC

Well, one of them anyways. Lead singer Emily Massey admits that the Jack Black film is the reason she started taking guitar lessons, but says her past with music stems back to a very early age. “My dad is a musician so I have been playing music and performing for pretty much my whole life,” Massey says.  “The first time I sang onstage, I was like one and a half….I don’t remember that. I remember doing a talent show in kindergarten. I really didn’t want to do it, my parents made me do it. I was crying before I went and sang. I sang ‘This Little Light of Mine’,” she recalls, adding that her dad produced a hip-hop, R&B instrumental track of the song for her to sing along to. Although she initially dreaded it, Massey learned to love performing during that experience. “This was at Emerson Elementary school in Madison, WI. Talent show. Kindergarten. I was five and I had the time of my life playing onstage.”

Guitarist Henry Stoehr says his venture into playing music started a little later than that. “Alex [Leeds] and I were just talking about this earlier actually, but I think it was 6th grade for me. We went to see Modest Mouse in Madison, and this band called Man Man opened for them. I feel like that was the first really strange music I heard, or at least saw live. I don’t know exactly what it did, but I felt like it–I started caring about things I didn’t care about that before,” he says.

Bassist Alex Leeds chimes in, saying the Man Man show created an existential moment for him as well. “It was better than Modest Mouse, it was crazy. I don’t think it made me want to play music… It changed the kind of music that I wanted to make.” Leeds continued on, shouting out School of Rock. “I was playing cello in the strings program in my elementary school, and when Jack Black said ‘Cello, you’ve got a bass,’ I was like that’s what I’m gonna do! Then I got a 2×4 and I put some front marks on it and started practicing some Beatles songs and played in the school show that year on the bass.”

THEIR FRIENDSHIP WITH POST ANIMAL TRACES BACK TO SIXTH GRADE

Slow Pulp and Post Animal have shared the stage many times, but the friendship roots between some of the band members dig deep. Throughout the course of my talk with Slow Pulp after their show at Daytrotter, members of Post Animal would pop by to chime in. “Six grade chemistry,” Post Animal guitarist Javi Reyes interjects; explaining that Leeds, Stoehr, and drummer Teddy Matthews have so much chemistry as a group because they’ve been playing together since sixth grade.

That same sense of chemistry transfers to a strong bond with Post Animal, too. “Jake [Hirshland] actually played with one of Henry, Alex and I’s band in high school,” Matthews says. Besides playing in bands with each other, the members of both bands also share an instrumental bond. “I gotta give a shout out to my dad…He made Jake Hirshland and Emily’s guitars…and the bass that I play,” Leeds says.

Despite all the history, the current day line up of Slow Pulp actually hasn’t been around that long, with Emily Massey being the most recent addition. “It’s been about a year and a half,” says Stoehr. “We took this trip to Philly and just played two shows. That was the end of 2016.”

“[After those shows,] they were like wait, Emily is okay. She can stay. I started in this band as rhythm guitarist and backing vocalist. Then it evolved. Now I’m a lead guitarist and vocalist,” Massey adds.

THEY’RE MOVING TO….

Just like their lineup has changed over time, Slow Pulp’s home base will soon change. Although they’re currently based in Madison, Slow Pulp has already garnered buzz in Chicago by playing shows ranging from DIY gigs at Observatory to support slots at staples around the city, like Beat Kitchen and Lincoln Hall. It won’t be long until the group continues to tick off more and more Chicago venues from their list, though, since they’re moving here!

“There’s a rumor flying around,” says Massey. “It is true. We are moving to Chicago. Over Summer/Fall/Winter,” she continues. At the moment, Massey, Matthews, and Stoehr are currently Madison based, while Leeds lives in Minneapolis. Come September, the band will still be somewhat divided, but not for long. “The three of them, Emily, Henry and Alex, are moving to Chicago in September…then I’m still in school til January,” says Matthews.

The band members say they’re all excited to be based in one place again by the end of the year, but they still have a lot of love for the Madison music scene. “One thing I was talking about on the way down here about the Madison scene… we were noticing differences between the Madison scene and the Minneapolis scene specifically, but I think it might apply more broadly than that… People, when they come out to shows, in my experience, realize that they’re also performers in that situation. And give a lot to the bands. In Madison,” Leeds says. “I love playing in Madison for that reason. It’s a very responsive crowd and we feed off that and off each other. I don’t experience that anywhere else,” he continues.

“It can also change very drastically very fast. It’s like, most of the young people are there for a few years for school. It definitely feels like the music scene changes every few years,” Stoehr adds.

THEIR INFLUENCES RANGE FROM ST. VINCENT TO THEE OH SEES

Slow Pulp possesses a refreshingly unique aura onstage, but they have an array of artists whose stage presence they admire and get inspired by. The group all simultaneously agree on loving the stage presence of TOPS. “I’ve loved their music for a long time, and when I went to go see them live, I was unsure what to expect, but I was blown away. They have a really cool way of presenting chill music in an exciting way,” Leeds says.

“I think mine are maybe Thee Oh Sees cause they’re so nuts. Then Omni because they’re so controlled,” Stoehr says. The group also all agree on Omni and Khruangbin as huge inspirations, calling the latter the “psychedelic Preatures.”

Lastly, Massey throws out some more inspiration from all across the genre-sphere, starting off with her old pals. “Post Animal! Javier Reyes is my favorite onstage live performer. He goes hard,” she says, continuing, “I’ve seen St. Vincent play, and that was a life changing show. It was so theatrical.” She pauses, adding “David Bowie forever!” to round things out.

THEY’RE ALSO VISUAL ARTISTS

While making their music, Slow Pulp is usually heavily influenced by tones, colors, and visual art. The link to visual art inspiring their sonic scapes comes from the band members all dabbling in art themselves, and that also comes across clearly in the vision behind their “Preoccupied” music video.

“We were very involved with it,” Massey says about conceptualizing the video, and the band members all explain that they had a fleshed out concept, but the process remained flexible and fluid throughout the day. “We kept coming up with ideas as we were filming,” Massey adds, also shouting out their friend and director Damien Blue for helping with vision.

The band’s artistic vision and flexibility to work through ideas transfers into their writing process as well. “I think we definitely talk about music in a visual way, and use visual art that we like as reference points for emotions,” Stoehr says. “I think especially with colors. We talk about colors a lot in that way– And I think we usually get it, in terms of colors…We’ll be like ‘I want this song to be brown’,” Massey elaborates.

“I think the way I think of songwriting is pretty similar to painting. At least for me they’re very problem-solving oriented and reacting to what you’ve just done. In a really immediate sense. You kind of just make decisions,” Stoehr adds. Even with their somewhat long-distance writing situation, with Leeds residing in Minneapolis, the band say they focus on writing music with their live show in mind. “Even in our current situation, we’re still trying to write songs that are live songs,” they say.



There you have it! As for the new music and material that the band have been working on, they say they still aren’t exactly sure when it will be released. At the moment they’re working through the different pieces they’ve created, trying to thread them together in a way that makes the most sense.

While you wait for this new content, make sure you catch Slow Pulp in concert this summer. See all of their tour dates here.


This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine

Event Preview: ANCHR Magazine Showcase with Blue Dream, Engine Summer, and Faux Furrs

Following their January showcase that celebrated their one year anniversary, local online music magazine ANCHR Magazine is hosting another show this month at the city’s newest venue, Sleeping Village. The lineup features Blue DreamEngine Summer and Faux Furrs and takes place on April 20th.  You can grab tickets to the show here, and get to know each band a little better below!

BLUE DREAM

The four-piece Chicago band consisting of Justin Sanetra, Anthony Cook, Jimmy Russell, and Danny Awisha recently released their debut album Volume Won; a captivating album with magnetic riffs and grooving bass lines that demand your attention. Blue Dream‘s electrifying stage presence amplifies their music to the next level, making them one of the city’s best live acts. Don’t miss your chance to see Blue Dream on 4/20; catch them headlining the show on Friday!

For Fans Of: Post Animal, Thee Oh Sees, Ty Segall

Start With: UFO,” “Freedom Eyes,”  “Who Stole The Flowers”

For more on Blue Dream-check out our interview with them here!


ENGINE SUMMER

This trio from Elmhurst, IL consisting of Jeremy Marsan, Ben Kostecki, and Ryan Ohm blends together post-punk and garage rock influences to form irresistibly catchy tunes that thread together one cohesive narrative on their debut album Trophy KidsCatch them bringing the story to life on the Sleeping Village stage this Friday.

For Fans Of: Omni, NE-HI, Deeper

Start With“Rather Choke,” “Trophy Kids,”  “Jezebel”

More on Engine Summer


FAUX FURRS

Ryan Deffet, Adam Karstens, Michael Oliva, and Ryan Shuck, AKA Faux Furrs,  bring all the good vibes with their lighthearted and upbeat melodies, which pair perfectly with the Spring weather that’s finally starting to hit the city this week. Get your dancing shoes ready and be prepared to bop around to their fun-spirited songs from their 2017 album TaxonomyAs the band describes their sound, it’s like “Garage Psych, in space”…make sure you come to the show to hear just how accurate that is.


For Fans Of: Frankie and the Witch Fingers, Summer Salt, Vundabar

Start With: “Fools Gold or the Lion,” “Moon Farm,” “Robot Love”

More on Faux Furrs

RSVP to the event on Facebook here!

New Vinyl Releases 4/13

  • A Place To Bury Strangers – Pinned (2 Lp Deluxe ‘Brainwashing Machine’ Edition on Pink Vinyl with Silver Foil Cover)
  • A Place To Bury Strangers – Pinned (Black Vinyl)
  • Bad Religion – The Gray Race (1996) (Limited Edition Reissue on Colored Vinyl)
  • David Bowie – CahngesTwoBowie (Comp Reissue on Blue or Black Vinyl)
  • Fever Ray – Plunge (2 Lp Deluxe Edition with Blood Red Gel Outer Sleeve)
  • Fiddlehead – Springtime And Blind (Limited to 600 on ‘Coke Bottle Clear’ Vinyl)
  • Gentle Leader XIV – Channels (Chicago, IL)
  • Hinds – I Don’t Run (Indie Exclusive on 150gram Opaque White Vinyl)
  • Hinds – I Don’t Run (150gram Black Vinyl)
  • JJUUJJUU – Zionic Mud (Blue Vinyl)
  • Jesse Kinch – I’m Not Like Everybody Else
  • Metallica – The $5.99 EP Garage Days Re-Revisited (1987) (Indie Exclusive on 180gram Red-Orange Vinyl)
  • Prof – Pookie Baby (2 Lp on White Vinyl with 16 Page Magazine)
  • Various / Soundtrack – Baby Driver Volume 2: The Score For A Score (150gram Vinyl)