New Vinyl Releases 6/22/18

  • Lily Allen – No Shame
  • Bishop Briggs – Church Of Scars
  • Doug Clifford – Doug ‘Cosmo’ Clifford (1972) (Remastered 180gram)
  • The Cure – Mixed Up (2 Lp 180gram Half-Speed Reissue)
  • The Cure -Torn Down (Mixed Up Extras) (2 Lp 180gram Half-Speed Repressing)
  • Dawes – Passwords (‘Indie Exclusive’ Translucent Yellow Vinyl)
  • Dio – Holy Diver (1983) (180gram Remastered)
  • Dio – The Last In Line (1984) (180gram Remastered)
  • Dio – Sacred Heart (1985) (180gram Remastered)
  • Dio – Dream Evil (1987) (180gram remastered)
  • Dio – Lock Up The Wolves (1990) (180gram Remastered)
  • Dio – Strange Highways (1994) (180gram Remastered)
  • Stella Donnelly – Thrush Metal EP (1st Pressing on White Vinyl, Limited to 1500)
  • Electric Wizard – Witchcult Today (Limited Edition Reissue on Purple Vinyl)
  • Tom Fogerty – Excalibur (1972) (180gram from Original Analog Master)
  • David Hillyard And The Rocksteady 7 – The Giver (‘Indie Exclusive’ White Vinyl)
  • Hiss Golden Messenger / Spacebomb – Passing Clouds 7″
  • Manic Street Preachers – Resistance Is Futile (Limited 180gram with CD)
  • Nine Inch Nails – Bad Witch
  • Panic! At The Disco – Pray For The Wicked
  • Pantera – Live At Dynamo Open Air (1998) (2 Lp with Gatefold)
  • The Record Company – All Of This Life (‘Indie Exclusive’ on Clear Blue Marble Vinyl)
  • Priscilla Renea – Coloured
  • Skeletonwitch – Forever Abomination (2011)
  • Skeletonwitch – Serpents Unleashed (2013) (Splatter Vinyl, Limited to 500)
  • Soulwax – Essential (180gram 2 Lp)
  • STRFKR – Reptillians (2011) (180gram Lavender Vinyl with Poster)
  • This Wild Life – Petaluma (‘Indie Exclusive’ Translucent Yellow Vinyl)
  • Twilight 22 – Twilight 22
  • Video Age – Pop Therapy
  • Frank Zappa – Burnt Weeny Sandwich (1970) (180gram Audiophile Repressing with Gatefold Jacket and Poster)

A Chat With Night Riots

Over the past few years, Night Riots has toured relentlessly; from supporting the likes of The Maine and Andrew McMahon to their own headline runs, it seems like the five piece is constantly up on stage, engaging crowds in cities across the country. Night Riots’ discography showcases a wide range of different musical styles, but their contagiously catchy melodies remain consistent, as does lead singer Travis Hawley’s signature vocals, which have drawn frequent comparisons to The Cure’s Robert Smith. Hawley’s timeless vocals translate even more powerfully when he’s up on the stage, charismatically commanding the room’s attention with his magnetic stage presence and bond with the entire band. While their recorded music has this quality that makes it instantly like-able, Night Riots’ live show only amplifies that quality, making their concerts a must see.

If you still haven’t found your way to one of their gigs, make sure you change that this month as they tour nationwide with Silent Rival and courtship. The tour swings through Chicago on Friday, June 22nd, but before they hit the Subterranean stage, get to know them as they discuss their ideal companion in an elevator outage, their favorite Ewoks, how they stay entertained on the road and more.


You’ve been on tour with courtship and Silent Rival since the start of the month. What’s your favorite part of touring with each of these bands?

It’s been awesome to be with bands that are good people.  It’s not always the case that you get along with everyone you tour with but both bands are awesome and really talented.

Speaking of tour, you’ll be in Chicago again on June 22nd, and you’ve played in Chicago several times in the past. What are some of your favorite things to do here?

We try to make a point to stop by the Chicago Music Exchange.  That place is amazing…has so many guitars and synths and just rad music gear.  Also always gotta hit up a Pequod’s Pizza for that deep dish.

How would you describe your live show on this tour in 3 words?

Energetic, theatrical and transportive.

Your song “Breaking Free” was recently featured in the show 13 Reasons Why...If you could pick any other TV show to have your music on, what show would you pick and why?

I’d want to go back in time and get a song on Star Trek TNG.  Maybe even have us be like a holodeck band or something.

You’ve had a couple new singles out this year, which are both great! What other plans for new releases do you have this year?

We’ve kinda been releasing unconventionally.  We aren’t necessarily releasing songs as legit singles.  We just want to get new music out there…maybe we will compile it into an album this year.

What are some of your favorite songs or albums from this year so far?

J. Cole’s new album KOD is rad.  Vacationer is putting out an album we are stoked for.  The new Kid Cudi/Kanye West album that just dropped is pretty tight too.

I saw your tweet the other day about the Gunslinger Series by Stephen King. What are some other books you’ve been into recently?

The Dark Tower series has been one of the best series I’ve read in a long time.  The scope and storytelling in it is remarkable. I think almost the whole band has read it at this point.  I just read The Stranger by Camus. I felt weird for a week.

Even though it seems like you’re constantly on tour and consistently working on new material, you guys are still really great with engaging fans on social media. What are some tips you have for managing your time with crazy tour schedules and how do you make sure to prioritize fan interaction?

At the end of the day the only reason we can continue what we do is because of the fans.  So I think it’s important to remember that. You need to be true to yourself and make art that is real but you also need to remember why you do it.  It’s fun and another way to be creative and think of new interesting ways to engage, entertain and help transport people out of their everyday lives… at least for a minute. Sticking to a schedule and consistency is key.

 

If you were stuck in an elevator with someone for a few hours, who would you want to be stuck with and why? (It could be anyone in the world.)

Probably Shaq because 1) He’d probably cradle you like a baby and calm you down 2) He could just rip the doors off and save you and 3) If it all goes to shit and you’re stuck, you could live off eating his body for like 6 months.

What’s one thing you’ve never been asked in an interview, but you’ve always wanted to talk about?

Who my five favorite Ewoks are.  Not in particular order they are: Chief Chirpa, Paploo, Teebo, Wicket, and Logray.


Grab your tickets to see Night Riots at The SubT this Friday, June 22nd here, and follow them on Facebook + Twitter + Instagram.

P.S- You can also grab a copy of Night Riots’ latest album in the shop or order it online here.



This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine

New Vinyl Releases 6/15/18

  • Tim Armstrong (of Rancid) – A Poets Life (Reissue with Gatefold)
  • ASG – Survive Sunrise (‘Blood Red’ Vinyl, Limited to 250)
  • Daniel Avery – Projector EP
  • The Aquabats – The Fury Of The Aquabats (1997) (2 Lp Reissue with Etched D-Side and Gatefold)
  • Big Sean & Metro Boomin – Double Or Nothing
  • Calpurnia – Scout EP  (Limited Edition Picture Disc)
  • Calpurnia – Scout EP (Indie Exclusive on ‘Swimming Pool Blue’ Vinyl)
  • Nick Cave & Warren Ellis – Kings (Original Motion Picture)
  • Culture Abuse – Bay Dream (Indie Exclusive on Opaque Yellow Vinyl)
  • Def Leppard – Vault: Greatest Hits (1980-1995) (2 Lp Compilation Reissue)
  • Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein – Stranger Things, Vol.1 (A Netflix Original Series) (2 Lp on ‘Upside Down Inter-Dimensional Blue’ Vinyl)
  • Gnod – Be Aware Of Your Limitations
  • Hatchie – Sugar & Spice EP (Single-Sided Pressing with Etched B-Side)
  • Igorrr – Savage Sinusoid (Red-Brown Marbled Vinyl, Limited to 500)
  • Igorrr – Savage Sinusoid (Gray-Green Marbled Vinyl, Limited to 500)
  • Kevin Krauter – Toss Up (Limited Edition on Green Vinyl)
  • Mayday Parade – Sunnyland (Limited Edition 1st Pressing on ‘Bone Colored’ Vinyl)
  • Melody’s Echo Chamber – Bon Voyage (Indie Exclusive on 180gramViolet Colored Vinyl with Phenaskitiscope Insert)
  • MOURN – Sorpresa Familia
  • Fantastic Negrito – Please Don’t Be Dead (Indie Exclusive)
  • Alanis Obomsawin – Bush Lady (1985) (180gram Reissue)
  • Orange Goblin – The Wolf Bites Back (Limited Edition Colored Vinyl with Gatefold)
  • Palberta – Roach Goin’ Down
  • Petal – Magic Gone (Limited Edition on Colored Vinyl)
  • Rolling Stones – Studio Albums Collection (1971-2016) (15 Lp Limited Edition 180gram Box Set)
  • SANGO – In Comfort Of (2 Lp with Gatefold)
  • Shitty Person – Judgement
  • Spotlights – Hanging By Faith (Limited Edition 12″ on White Vinyl)
  • State Champs – Living Proof (Indie Exclusive on White Vinyl, Limited to 500)
  • Tangents – New Bodies
  • Matthew Logan Vasquez – Texas Murder Ballads
  • Tom Waits – Bastards (2 Lp 180gram Remastered Pressing with Gatefold)
  • Tom Waits – Bawlers (180gram Remastered Pressing with Gatefold)
  • Tom Waits – Brawlers (180gram Remastered Pressing with Gatefold)
  • X-Altera – X-Altera (Limited Edition on Neon Green Vinyl)

New Vinyl Releases 6/8/18

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  • 30 Seconds to Mars – America (White vinyl)
  • Bad Breeding – Abandonment EP
  • Black Sabbath – Supersonic Years: The Seventies Singles (10x 7″ Box Set)
  • Kadhja Bonet – Childqueen (Indie Exclusive on Color vinyl)
  • The Drowning Craze – Singles ’81 / ’82 (180gram White vinyl)
  • dvsn – Morning After
  • EPMD – Strictly Business (‘Respect The Classics’ Reissue)
  • EPMD – Unfinished Business (‘Respect The Classics’ Reissue)
  • The Get Up Kids – Kicker EP (180gram Pink vinyl)
  • GUM – The Underdog
  • Laura Jean – Devotion
  • Kississippi – Sunset Blush
  • Liz Phair – Whitechocolatespaceegg (Reissue)
  • Liz Phair – Liz Phair (Reissue)
  • Liz Phair – Whip-Smart (Reissue)
  • The Rolling Stones – Their Satanic Majesties Request (180gram Reissue)
  • Royce Da 5’9″ – Book of Ryan
  • serpentwithfeet – soil (Limited Opaque Yellow vinyl)
  • Shannon Shaw – In Nashville
  • Paul Simon – The Paul Simon Songbook
  • Jaden Smith – SYRE
  • Jorja Smith – Lost & Found
  • Soundtrack / Simon & Garfunkel – The Graduate
  • Soundtrack – Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story
  • Soundtrack / Colin Stetson – Hereditary
  • Uniform / The Body – Mental Wounds Not Healing (Limited Clear vinyl)
  • Tom Waits – Small Change (‘Indie Exclusive’ Reissue on Blue vinyl)
  • Whiplash – Power and Pain (Reissue)
  • Hilary Woods – Colt (Limited Blue vinyl)
  • YOB – Our Raw Heart (Metallic Gold vinyl, Limited to 2500)
  • Young Widows – Decayed: Ten Years of Cities, Wounds, Lightness, And Pain
  • Zeal & Ardor – Stranger Fruit (180gram Purple vinyl)

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard – Polygondwanaland

Friday we release our 2nd Pressing of 50 made on 180 gram UK black vinyl.
Hand Printed black & white “coloring book style” screen signed & numbered cover by Andy Schmidt from Starman Press

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Get To Know: Shame

If you’ve ever attended SXSW, you know that it’s not like any ol’ regular music festival with set stages and scheduled performance times; There’s super official secret shows with big name artists, last minute pop up shows, unofficial showcases by new artists in the most random places around town, and multiple sets by the same artists in a single day. This past March, I finally attended my first ever SXSW and quickly learned just how unconventional this festival can be when I found myself interviewing Charlie Steen of the British punk band Shame at 1 AM after my friend had just cut his hair (as well as his bandmates’ hair) into a mullet.

Easily one of the buzziest bands at the festival, Shame has been soaring high since the January release of their debut album Songs of Praise, which has in fact been receiving endless praise from listeners around the world. This summer, Shame will return to The States to play a handful of dates, including a show at Chicago’s Empty Bottle as well as the annual West Fest street fest. Before they return to Chicago in July, get to know the band better by checking out these six facts I learned while chatting with Steen earlier this year.

 Photo by Holly Whitaker
Photo by Holly Whitaker

THEY RECORDED IN THE LEGENDARY ROCKFIELD STUDIOS

With the amount of buzz they’ve garnered and the sheer amount of gigs and festivals Shame has played, you might be surprised to find out that the members of Shame are only 20 and 21 years old. Before they started touring heavily, the band worked on writing their debut album for a few years, starting at the ages of 16 and 17. “We were still in school, and we recorded the album when we were 20,” Steen says.

Talking about the process behind writing the album, Steen continues, “Lyrically, it was about personal sort of things you experience in that time as well social observations. Musically, it was influenced by what we were exposed to in that period. All the different bands we discovered through just being that age and being into music.” Once they had written the album, the band took a trip to the iconic Rockfield Studios in Wales to record the tracks. “It was kind of like rehab,” Steen says about the middle-of-nowhere location of the studio, where they resided for ten days. “We’re quite bad at distractions. So, we were on a farm, and this place is like a historic studio. Oasis, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Led Zeppelin, all these people recorded there. Not many people go there now…Because everyone seems to just record with their laptop or a studio in London,” he says, pausing to describe the scene. “You have like a farm, and then you have a house up top. That’s where we stayed, we each had our own room. Then you walk past the stables and stuff like that and there’s a recording studio. I was up at the house, and I did all of my vocals in my bedroom with a bed sheet over me, onto an Apple Mac. The rest of the band, they did everything to a click [in the studio].”

Prior to their work at Rockfield Studios, Steen recalls working their way through several different producers in order to finally get the right fit with Dan Foat and Nathan Boddy. “I’m not a musician, so I don’t want to put my foot in a shoe that won’t fit, but before that, we’d worked with eight different producers. They all had done the same method of ‘you’re a live band, let’s try to make you sound like some punk band from the 80’s where you record it live.’ That wasn’t how it worked best. Dan and Nathan are from an electronic background, techno producers…They did it a completely unique and different way. Like Charlie, our drummer, he recorded his drum kit individually, each song. They saw it in the same way that fits our music, where the bass and the drums are the pulse and that was very important,” Steen says. “We then realized through trial and error that the best way to approach it for us, was to try to create something completely different to our live sound. So they’re two different things. Sometimes people say it sounds like it does live, but to us it’s a great difference than how it sounds on the record. It’s a lot more concise,” he continues.

THEY ADMIT THEIR MUSIC IS DERIVATIVE, BUT THEY STILL ENJOY IT

One of the most compelling features of Shame’s music is the incredibly raw, honest quality of their songwriting. Reflecting on their style of writing, Steen says, “With the type of music we’re doing…we’re a guitar punk band in 2018. We’re very aware it’s very derivative. There’s no way we could ever deny that. I think with us–I’ve said this before, with bands and artists we might be compared to, and those that might have heavily influenced us, we’ll never have been able to experience it. That’s amazing for us. When we get to see bands like Goat Girl and Sorry and stuff, it’s amazing that we can experience it. For us, it does feel new and refreshing.” Ultimately, they were never trying to be someone else when they started writing, and they’re still just trying to stick to their own vision. “At the end of the day, we never did this with dreams of like having 5-star hotels. It wasn’t ever manufactured. It was all just part of the process. We are just very passionate about music and we know that it’s been done before, but we enjoy doing it. I think the main thing is we don’t write music for anyone other than ourselves. At the end of the day, this is entertainment and we really enjoy it. We’re having a laugh,” Steen adds.

In addition to being authentic, Shame strives to keep their sound and vision multifaceted. “I think one of the preconceptions of a punk guitar band is aggression. Which you know could be lost in translation from energy or passion, or humor at times. That’s something we want to separate. Of course there are issues we’re angry about, but we don’t want to be a band that just conveys one emotion. That’s not human. We want to be able to express humor and melancholy,” Steen says. As they keep pushing to diversify their sound, they also keep pushing themselves to grow and adapt. “We’re very self aware. When we did that album we were teenage boys…that was when we wrote that album. We know now that a lot has changed in our personal lives, which also reflects in the general absurdity of being in a band. It’s just a weird life to live. You feel very temporary. At all times. We basically just want to adapt and evolve. We don’t wanna write the same songs we did before,” he says, adding that their constantly changing environment deeply affects them as a band and as people.

THEIR REHEARSAL SPACE LED THEM TO DISCOVER MUSIC IN A NEW LIGHT

In addition to recording in a legendary music space, Shame also first formed in the rehearsal space of the legendary Queen’s Head in Brixton, which is where the likes of Fat White Family rehearsed as well.

Steen attributes their early rehearsal space to some of their current habits as music fans, saying, “When we started in the Queen’s Head…This is one of the differences; Before, we’d grown up going to venues like Brixton Academy, really large venues like that and seeing bands who had already established themselves in a position of accomplishment. When we went to go to the Queen’s Head, personally I was able to discover bands who were playing a lot more intimate settings. Not known world wide. The realization that great music exists with an accessibility to a more intimate setting is a sort of relief.”

“These were bands who, you say what you want them about personalities, but they were characters. It wasn’t just some pop culture. When you grow up and you’ve only ever seen the bands who perform on a platform of success, you can sometimes overlook the reality of a lot of situations. Of course everyone grew up listening to The Ruts and Stiff Little Fingers. So we knew about these bands, but to get to know them. You realize they’re people. And I think their intentions to do whatever the fuck they wanted…they’d gone past the point of remorse. Which was the best thing about it,” Steen continues.

THEIR STAGE PRESENCE IS JUST AN AMPLIFIED VERSION OF THEMSELVES

The same sense of authenticity that Shame’s music has transfers over into their live shows; at SXSW, Steen often told their audiences to loosen up and smile, saying “this is entertainment.” Steen says he never feels intimidated to get up onstage and deliver such a transparent show. “When I was younger, and I say younger as in like a year ago, I definitely had idolized a lot of people. Then I found that to be quite damaging because you gain this obsession and sort of like–” Steen pauses and snaps his fingers, trying to think of the best way to phrase it. “It’s unattainable identity. At that period, when we play, it’s definitely to an extent a persona. It’s who I am, but amplified,” he continues.

Essentially, their stage presence will continue to remain an extension of themselves. Steen muses further on the concept of immense stage personalities, saying, “When I would look up to all these people like Iggy Pop or Lou Reed or whatever like, it was always…if you’re constantly comparing yourself, that’s what I found damaging. I think like I was saying, I don’t believe anything can be separated from context. At this age as well, you’re in the middle of this identity crisis, so you want to absorb all of these different personalities and be these people you obsess over. Then it got to the point where I’d just rather be myself. I was just this chubby, shy stoner as a teenager. When we used to play, that was the whole point: If you’ve been insulted so much your whole life, what have you got to lose?”

TOURING HAS TAUGHT THEM THEIR LIMITS

Shame just finished another UK and European tour after returning from a North American run, which saw them playing upwards of five shows in a day at this year’s SXSW, but believe it or not their recent touring schedule is nothing compared to the previous year. “Last year we did like 140 gigs and 57 festivals in 3 months, like whilst recording an album and doing 5 tours. By the end I got a bit broken mentally,” Steen says. “It’s hereditary but I suffer from anxiety so now I can only speak for myself…On the road, I don’t drink as much and don’t do drugs as much as we used to. Every night used to be a party. I sound like an old man,” he laughs. “I feel like an old man. So that’s how I kind of deal with it.”

Their intense past experiences ended up acting as a learning experience, where Steen personally discovered where his breaking point is. “The period of what I went through in December, where we ended up having to cancel this tour in Germany, I learned a lot more about myself than I have in my entire life. So I know when is too much. I know when I need a good night’s sleep. Like I need a good night’s sleep now, but it’s a celebration. I know what I need to do. I guess I sort of learned the value of responsibility a bit more. As a person, and this is a little bit hypocritical of me to say after saying that, but I can’t do moderation. I can’t do it at all. So I know that if I have one drink, I won’t drink until I fall asleep. And I can’t do one line. I’ll do it until it runs out. I can’t do that. If I’m not doing that, I can’t do anything. So it’s either one or the other, but that’s me as a person,” he says.

While Steen may have personally learned to rein in his limits, he also realizes as a band they have to compromise sometimes. “We’ve known each other since we were kids. Sean has been my best mate since we were 8. We understand each other very well. I don’t particularly like playing a lot of shows, for my own personal reasons. If the rest of the band wants to do it, you have to find a middle ground. After what happened we’re looking through a sharper lens about how many gigs we do. So like this festival season we slashed loads of festivals cause it’s not worth flying from Poland to play to 40 people in Kent to fly back to the Ukraine the next day.”

As far as the biggest lesson that Steen has learned about the band through the years, besides learning his limits, he says, “You kind of lose a lot–this might sound very dramatic, but you kind of lose a lot of human rights. And by that, I don’t mean like I’m shackled in chains in a 4×4 room. I mean, in terms of you kind of lose the things that make you feel human. Eating a meal with your mum and dad or like going for a drink with your friends. You lose people you love, your friends and family. It sort of disappears. Familiarity becomes an abstract ideology. I still don’t think I know a lot about myself. I think as people we know each other so well, we [the band] went beyond friendship about 2 years ago. It’s almost like a cult. I guess, I don’t know, you have to deal with everything you deal within a normal life, like breaking up with someone, moving out of home… you have to do that through the band. The biggest amount of privacy I get is when I go to the toilet. Fact. For 6 and a half weeks. So I think you lose privacy. But you know I’m saying all this and we fucking enjoy it and we love it. Whatever we have to lose at this particular moment in time, personally, I feel is because we want to do this. I want to do this. We want to do this to the best of our ability.”

THEY’LL ALWAYS USE THEIR PLATFORM IN A POSITIVE WAY

Through their music, social media, and even past interviews, the members of Shame have made it clear that they’ll never shy away from standing up for what’s right. At one of their shows at SXSW, Steen jumped off stage mid-show to tell off an audience member who had gotten aggressive with some of the other crowd members. Touching on their habit to speak out, Steen says, “As a person, and a white man, we don’t want to…I don’t want to be the spokesperson for any problem or any inequalities with girls, or race, or religion. But as a human being, I don’t understand how you could not want to support all these people and fight against any inequality. I think we all feel it’s disgusting for anyone who has any sort of platform to not [use it].”

Steen also reflects on the tendency of the press to label them as a political band, but says they never saw it like that; they just realize it’s something that directly effects them. “At the end of the day, it’s the biggest bullshit that a person could say ‘I’m not political.’ Everyone has politics, it’s just whether or not they choose to share them. How could you not talk about it? I don’t know, it doesn’t really make sense to me. There are a lot of great bands who will speak on these issues, and I think particularly in the current climate, in the music industry, and every industry, but this is the one we’re most absorbed in because this is our life.” He continues, shouting out people like Princess Nokia who speak out on all these issues, adding, “As a guy, like who is constantly surrounded by the music industry all the time, it is without a doubt and without question, majority middle class, white men. That’s how it’s been for probably just under 100 years. With the birth of pop culture, all of these unforgivable acts of discrimination were erupted that weren’t extinguished. They shouldn’t have been there in the first place, but they should have been addressed and destroyed when it came out.”

Lastly, Steen asks that everyone remains respectful of others when they come to shows, especially one of their gigs. “At a guitar gig, like a mosh pit, it’s mainly like male aggression taken out. We don’t fucking want that at our shows. Like it’s a safe environment. I’ve never won a fight, I’ve only ever been beaten up. Honestly. We’re not the jocks, we’re not the cool kids, we’re the people who just want to enjoy ourselves and we want everyone else to enjoy themselves as well. It’s not fucking hard, it’s not a lot to ask. If you’re an asshole, don’t come to our show.”


Make sure you grab your tickets to Shame’s show at The Empty Bottle here and keep up with them on Facebook + Twitter + Instagram.

You can also order your own copy of Songs of Praise here!

This article was originally posted on ANCHR Magazine